Home ENTERTAINMENT When RK Narayan’s ‘Malgudi Days’ came alive at LFW 2018

When RK Narayan’s ‘Malgudi Days’ came alive at LFW 2018

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Pic courtesy: http://www.theweek.in

Mumbai: Designer Gaurav Khanijo infused quintessential classic with contemporary pop fusion for a collection that was inspired from the TV series “Malgudi Days” at Lakme Fashion Week (LFW) Summer/Resort 2018.

Making its debut for the year 2018, fitness brand Reebok came together with Khanijo for a show that was a relaxed presentation under a canopy of fluttering metres of sustainable fabrics in the Central Avenue – one of the most unusual venues for a fashion show.

Khanijo’s men’s wear collection quaintly called “Circa Malgudi” for his ‘Khanijo’ label was inspired by the popular stories of The Malgudi Days TV series, which he turned into a runway fashion opera and paid homage to his childhood memories on day three at Lakme Fashion Week (LFW) Summer/Resort 2018.

Bringing clothes that spelt simple living with a somewhat uniform approach in fashion, the designer gave a stylish slant to garments that were inspired by simple folk wear. The collection was teamed up with Reebok’s Classic and Pump Supreme collection creating a sport-inspired look.

Recreating a bit of the pre-independence era look, the designer obviously selected Khadi as the fabric with a soul and worked it with bits of drapery, along with perfect tailoring and included Indian weaving techniques. The subtle hues of Khadi were supported by the interplay of the monotone Reebok collection, making the apparel a modern take on classic style.

Commenting on the association, Silvia Tallon, Senior Marketing Director, Reebok India said: “With the label Khanijo, we saw an instantaneous affinity showcasing the coming together of Modern and Retro, giving athleisure a defining element..”

There were comfy crushed handloom silk trousers to recreate nostalgia. The double-breasted suits had a marked throwback look of 2010, and the jackets were textured with scratched, burnt and frayed treatment, which has been designer’s signature touch.

Trousers also sported some interesting prints, while linen shirts were given the pastel colour treatment, but turtleneck sweaters looked ideal for summer days. Colours were kept on a sepia toned palette with shades of brown being in the forefront.

The carefully curated collection comprised both men’s and just two women’s, with each piece tailored to emulate the classic styles of 1940s India. The colours ranged from baby blue, mustard yellow, plum, blush pink, slate grey and also included wardrobe staple tones like white and black.

Blended colours in a tie-dye style helped to accentuate the textures of the fabrics used. Breathable fabrics like Khadi, handloom silk, cotton and linen were used to create silhouettes like dhoti pants, trench coats, kurtas, vests, jackets, shirts, trousers and shorts, some of which were dappled by delicate subdued prints and motifs.

The two women’s ensembles were particularly interesting. A colour blocked trouser in black and pink was teamed with a white kurta, which was followed by black palazzo shorts matched with a deep purple coat. (IANS)